Small Business Websites Made Easy

thriftmac


Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.

Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.



Comments are open





  



Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.

Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.



Comments are open





  



Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.

Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.



Comments are open





  



Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.

Alert yourself to Mac freeware

We’ve already told you how to find Mac freeware by using StumbleUpon’s Firefox add-on. And here’s another way: with e-mail notifications from Google Alerts.

Once you’re at the Alerts website, you simply fill in a form and Google does the rest. The most important part is the search terms. We filled in “mac freeware” (without the quote marks). From there, you can choose whether you want Google to search news, blogs, the web, groups or comprehensive — which means all of them. We chose “comprehensive.” The next step is to decide whether you want to receive e-mail once a day, as-it-happens or once a week. We found “once a day” to be satisfactory. The last step, of course, is to provide your e-mail address. Google promises not to sell or share it.

Google then sends you an e-mail that asks you to verify that you do indeed want to receive the Alerts. This is a nice feature to ensure you don’t get something you don’t really want. And by the way, every Alert has a link that allows you to cancel them at any time.

Our experience in the couple of weeks that we’ve been receiving Google Alerts has been a mixed bag. What we’re getting are references to articles that have the words “mac” and “freeware” in them. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into “mac freeware.” Some of the references seem only peripherally related to Mac freeware.

Still, as with any service of this sort, if you’re willing to sort the wheat from the chaff, you’ll find some nifty stuff. It was, for example, an Alert that brought Jake’s top 10 Mac freeware to our attention.

We’re going to keep the Alerts coming for now. It’s only once a day, and the list of links is far from onerous. Best of all, it means another source of news for thriftmac readers.



Comments are open